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Use of “in” with ablative

CGesange

New Member

I'm hoping someone can clarify the meaning of the medieval Latin phrase "in ipsa" when referring to a decision or action not being "in" or "upon" someone, which I assume means that the decision isn't theirs to make? Here's the sentence: ""Quae Johanna iterum respondit quod in ipsa non erat hoc facere ; et, si in ipsa esset, hoc esset bene cito factum."
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

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Location:
Belgium

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Location:
Belgium
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