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Redit expectata diu

A

Anonymous

Guest

REDIT EXPECTATA DIU

Hi, can anyone help translate this phrase into English? It's supposed to be a motto on a coat of arms.

I understand that

Redit = return, give back, fall back on, pay back, etc

Expectata = await, expect, anticipate, hope for, etc.

Diu = by day, all day, for a long time

But I can't make a phrase/motto out of that.

Thanks for any help. :)
 

TheLatinPoet

New Member

Location:
Worcester, MA - USA
If it's a motto on a coat of arms, I would say it means
"Always give what is expected..." of you therefore covering all aspects of repaying debts and being honorable
 

Tacitus

New Member

Location:
Ancient Roman Empire
This is a good version.
The verb is in third person, so: s/he daily gives what is expected.
 

jaffa

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
London
I wonder if that expectata could be from the verb expectare: to await for. It looks like the passive, feminine form for that verb. Therefore a possible translation might be:
Having been awaited for/expected a long time, she returns.
 

Livia

Member

Location:
Ancient Roman Empire
I looked the word up in Whittaker's Words and this is what I got

expectat.a VPAR 1 1 NOM S F PERF PASSIVE PPL
expectat.a VPAR 1 1 ABL S F PERF PASSIVE PPL
expectat.a VPAR 1 1 NOM P N PERF PASSIVE PPL
expectat.a VPAR 1 1 ACC P N PERF PASSIVE PPL
expecto, expectare, expectavi, expectatus V [XXXCX]
await, expect; anticipate; hope for;

So the word can be both ablative and accusative. So, if it is ablative absolute, then jaffa's translation is fully legit - not totally fitting to be a motto though..
 
A

Anonymous

Guest

Thanks all for the input! At least it narrows it down to a couple likely meanings!
 
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