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"Out There" and other idioms

girafa666

New Member

Hello, all, this is my first post and I would like to kindly ask you to help me with a problem.
I've been thinking about some names for a project of mine and I would like to test some latin translations of english idioms such as:
-"Out there"
-"Far Out"
-"Outer Road(Path)"
-"Outlandish"
-"Open Path"

I understand these are very colloquial terms so if you could help me with literal translations I would be very grateful.

Thank you all!
 

Callaina

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We can try to translate this, but I have to warn you that I can't think of any Roman idiom for "odd/strange/unexpected" (I take it that's what you're getting at) that uses the Latin equivalent of the word "out". Can you say a bit more about who or what is "out there", and in what sense?
 

Callaina

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In the meantime, "Open Path" could probably be translated as via patens.
 

girafa666

New Member

Hi, Callaina, these are actually potential names for an artistic association, so they do not refer to anything specific.
The meaning you deduced is pretty accurate but there's also some word play here since the association is dedicated to international productions(artistic mobility) so the word "out" acquires a second meaning.
Like I said I know there will be no perfect or easy translation. The reason I asked for more than other phrase is to have a few different options soundwise, which is important for a name.
If you know any latin expressions with similar meanings I'd be more than happy to know them, but a simple literal translation would be great as well.

Thank you very much!
 

Callaina

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Hmmm... Externa might work - literally, "things that are foreign/from another country/strange" (note that this means "strange" in the sense of being foreign, from another place, not "strange" in the sense of something that's intrinsically strange.) The Latin prefix ex- literally means "out (of)", so that preserves the wording a bit.
 

girafa666

New Member

Thank you. The problem with "externa" is that this word exists in portuguese(I'm from Brazil) as well, and has a variety of meanings other than the one you mentioned, so it would be a bit confusing. I did think about using "exterius" or "ex terminus"(are these correct?), though.

How would you translate the first and/or second ones("Out there" and "Far Out") in a direct translation?
 
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Callaina

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Latin doesn't really have any equivalent for "out there", at least not that I know of. If you wanted to express that idea in Latin you would probably have to word it some different way depending on context.

As for "far out"...hmmm...possibly something like Exteriora/Externa procul/longe sita (literally: "Outside things situated far away")? That still sounds horribly unidiomatic, though.
 

Callaina

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Basically, neither English phrase is remotely close to how the Romans would have expressed that sort of idea (sorry)... :(
 

Callaina

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Now, as for "Outer road/path", that's much easier: Via exterior or Via externa.
 

syntaxianus

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I suggest

longe hinc = far from here
longinque hinc = a long way from here / "far out"
distantissimum! = way out there!

insolitum = unusual
peregrinissimum = "very foreign"
barbaricum = outlandish
 
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