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Nunc in ipso discrimine

Pacifica

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"Since" also is a correct translation for cum.
Sorry, I had somewhat lost sight of the context when I wrote that. I now realize "while" would probably work better here.
How does omnium agree with opinione? Omnium is genitive plural and opinione is ablative singular….?
Omnium doesn't agree with opinione but it modifies it (goes with it, refers to it).
life and fact (Gen.)
Vita and factis are ablative.
I may can get “all the condemned opinion”, knowing omnium goes with opinione.
That's wrong. To get that meaning, both omnium and damnatus would have to agree with opinione.

Omnium
is genitive, as you said. What's the meaning of a genitive?

Damnatus
is masucline nominative singular. So what could it agree with?
 

john abshire

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Sorry, I had somewhat lost sight of the context when I wrote that. I now realize "while" would probably work better here.

Omnium doesn't agree with opinione but it modifies it (goes with it, refers to it).

Vita and factis are ablative.

That's wrong. To get that meaning, both omnium and damnatus would have to agree with opinione.

Omnium
is genitive, as you said. What's the meaning of a genitive?

Damnatus is masucline nominative singular. So what could it agree with?
Damnatus must agree with homo, “condemned man”, but why are the words so far apart? And damnatus; isn’t this “having been condemned” the ppp, instead of damnatus, a, um?
(Is there any difference?)
Opinione omnium = the opinion of all
But; I don’t know what to do with vita or factis
 

Pacifica

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Damnatus must agree with homo
Yes.
but why are the words so far apart?
That's just Latin word order. The word damnatus is qualified by the words vita atque factis onmium iam opinione, and words that modify a verb or verbal element like a participle tend to precede it (this isn't an absolute rule, but it happens very often).
isn’t this “having been condemned” the ppp, instead of damnatus, a, um?
(Is there any difference?)
Damnatus, a, um is a PPP meaning "(having been) condemned".
Opinione omnium = the opinion of all
Yes, but you need one more word to convey the idea of the ablative.
But; I don’t know what to do with vita or factis
They're the things in respect to which/by which he's condemned.
 

john abshire

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Yes.

That's just Latin word order. The word damnatus is qualified by the words vita atque factis onmium iam opinione, and words that modify a verb or verbal element like a participle tend to precede it (this isn't an absolute rule, but it happens very often).

Damnatus, a, um is a PPP meaning "(having been) condemned".

Yes, but you need one more word to convey the idea of the ablative.
They're the things in respect to which/by which he's condemned.
The condemned man, in life and by facts, now in the opinion of all,

when you said damnatus is “qualified” by “vita atque factis omnium iam opinione”; do you mean that the phrase describes the way he was condemned? (And not in a grammatical sense?)
So it is kinda backwards from English, where you would say “the man, condemned in life and by facts in the opinion of all”; Latin is “the man, in life and by facts in the opinion of all condemned”?
 
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Pacifica

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The condemned man, in life and by facts, now in the opinion of all,
No.

"In the opinion of all" is correct.

Iam in this context = already.

Start with "a man already condemned..."
when you said damnatus is “qualified” by “vita atque factis omnium iam opinione”; do you mean that the phrase describes the way he was condemned?
Broadly speaking, yes.
(And not in a grammatical sense?)
It is also a grammatical matter.
So, in general Latin works this way?
As I said, it isn't a strict rule, but there's a tendency.
 

john abshire

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No.

"In the opinion of all" is correct.

Iam in this context = already.

Start with "a man already condemned..."

Broadly speaking, yes.

It is also a grammatical matter.

As I said, it isn't a strict rule, but there's a tendency.
A man already condemned, by his way of life and by his deeds in the opinion of all,
Edited
 
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Pacifica

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in life and by facts
Better "by his (way of) life and by his deeds".

Next:

pecuniae magnitudine sua spe ac praedicatione absolutus.


Notice the parallelism between these last two parts:

vita atque factis / pecuniae magnitudine
omnium opinione / sua spe ac praedicatione
damnatus / absolutus
 

john abshire

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Better "by his (way of) life and by his deeds".

Next:

pecuniae magnitudine sua spe ac praedicatione absolutus.

Notice the parallelism between these last two parts:

vita atque factis / pecuniae magnitudine
omnium opinione / sua spe ac praedicatione
damnatus / absolutus
(I’m traveling)
having been acquitted by the magnitude of money and by his hope and proclamation
?
 

Pacifica

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"in his own hope and proclamation (i.e., as he himself hopes and proclaims) (already) acquitted by the magnitude of (his) money"
 

Pacifica

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It isn't a sentence. Only a fragment of one.
 

john abshire

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"in his own hope and proclamation (i.e., as he himself hopes and proclaims) (already) acquitted by the magnitude of (his) money"
I was going to ask how you know the phrasing of this last part (or the ones before this for that matter), but it must be context? I can see the context now, after it is all in front of me, but…….
 
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