Miscellaneous Questions from the Vulgate

CMatthiasT88

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Location:
Mandan, ND, USA
Sobrii estote, et vigilate: quia adversarius vester diabolus tamquam leo rugiens circuit, quærens quem devoret: cui resistite fortes in fide: scientes eamdem passionem ei quæ in mundo est vestræ fraternitati fieri. 1 Pet. 5.8-9

Be sober and watch: because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, goeth about seeking whom he may devour. Whom resist ye, strong in faith: knowing that the same affliction befalls your brethren who are in the world.
Thank you, I think I may have solved this but wanting to double check my parsing. Eamdem passionen I would say is the accusative subject of the verb fieri which is a passive infinitive. Ei is a feminine dative pronoun in apposition to the dative vestrae fraternitati, and quae is a nominative singular feminine relative pronoun referring also to fraternitati.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
Eamdem passionen I would say is the accusative subject of the verb fieri
Yes.
Ei is a feminine dative pronoun in apposition to the dative vestrae fraternitati,
Ei simply agrees with vestrae fraternitati. An apposition is something different (when one noun or phrase renames another as in Roma, urbs aeterna, a Romulo Remoque condita est, where urbs aeterna is an apposition to Roma).
and quae is a nominative singular feminine relative pronoun referring also to fraternitati.
Yes.
 

CMatthiasT88

Member

Location:
Mandan, ND, USA
Idcirco unus interitus est hominis et jumentorum, et æqua utriusque conditio. Sicut moritur homo, sic et illa moriuntur. Similiter spirant omnia, et nihil habet homo jumento amplius: cuncta subjacent vanitati, et omnia pergunt ad unum locum. Ecc. 3:19-20

Therefore the death of man, and of beasts is one, and the condition of them both is equal: as man dieth, so they also die: all things breathe alike, and man hath nothing more than beast: all things are subject to vanity. And all things go to one place:
Thank you. Here I'm wondering why subjacent would be in the active voice. I take cuncta to be in the nominative plural and vanitati to be dative. I would have expected the verb to be in passive or reflexive, but perhaps my understanding is clouded by how we use this verb in English. Would you say that subicio is being used intransitively here or that perhaps it is transitive with its object implied?
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
You've attributed the form to the wrong verb. Subiacent is from subiaceo (an intransitive verb indeed).
 

CMatthiasT88

Member

Location:
Mandan, ND, USA
Etenim quia non profertur cito contra malos sententia, absque timore ullo filii hominum perpetrant mala. Attamen peccator ex eo quod centies facit malum, et per patientiam sustentatur; ego cognovi quod erit bonum timentibus Deum, qui verentur faciem ejus. -Eccl. 8.11-12

For because sentence is not speedily pronounced against the evil, the children of men commit evils without any fear. But though a sinner do evil a hundred times, and by patience be borne withal, I know from thence that it shall be well with them that fear God, who dread his face.
Thank you. Here I don't know what role ex eo quod performs, or the antecedent of eo.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
Eo has no antecedent, but is itself the antecedent of the quod clause. Ex eo quod = from the fact that.
 

CMatthiasT88

Member

Location:
Mandan, ND, USA
Qualis est dilectus tuus ex dilecto, o pulcherrima mulierum? qualis est dilectus tuus ex dilecto, quia sic adjurasti nos? -Cant. 5:9

What manner of one is thy beloved of the beloved, O thou most beautiful among women? what manner of one is thy beloved of the beloved, that thou hast so adjured us?
Thank you, here I'm wondering what the sense would be of ex dilecto.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
Methinks we have a case of translational weirdness here.

My first idea was that "thy beloved of the beloved" might be a Hebrew way of emphasizing how beloved the beloved is (beloved of the beloved = most beloved), although I would have rather expected ex dilectis (plural) or, even more so, dilectorum (gen. pl.) for that meaning.

I checked a gloss tranlation of the Hebrew, and it says something completely different from my shaky theory.

The KJV also has it that way: SONG OF SOLOMON CHAPTER 5 KJV (kingjamesbibleonline.org)

Note that the Hebrew word for "than" is the same word that means "from".

At a stretch, you can extract the meaning "compared to" from Latin ex. But the phrase sure doesn't make for a lot of clarity here.
 
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