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Interesting Words (moved from Games)

Pacifica

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And a square is "vierkant"... that is, a "fourside". My heart is melting. That doesn't correspond to a Latin word like "driehoek" to "triangle". I guess they came up with it by themselves.
 

Pacifica

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Dutch "vanzelfsprekend", "speaking of (i.e. by) itself", i.e. "obvious", "self-evident".
 
E

Etaoin Shrdlu

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There was an OE word here cognate with the German Heer, meaning army, but we've abandoned it in favour of the French-from-Latin term. Nothing particularly surprising there, because there are lots of words like that. What does strike me as odd are the words that are related to it: harbour, harbinger and sodding herring. In French you see it in auberge.
 

Pacifica

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What does strike me as odd are the words that are related to it: harbour, harbinger and sodding herring. In French you see it in auberge.
Not sure about herring.

I think I'd read (and forgotten) about the relationship of harbinger to here, but not about harbour and auberge. Very nice!
 

Pacifica

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Dutch "jarig" (quasi "yeary") = "having one's birthday (on a particular day)". E.g. "Hij is vandaag jarig" = "It's his birthday today."
 

Pacifica

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Pacifica

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Dutch "hebzucht" and German "Habsucht". According to Wiktionary, the former is a calque of the latter. Both mean "greed". Greed is the fact of seeking to have, right? Well, that's exactly what those words, apt in the typical Germanic manner, mean. The first elements (heb- and Hab-) are related to the verb "have"; and the second are related to the verb "seek".
 
B

Bitmap

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Dutch "hebzucht" and German "Habsucht". According to Wiktionary, the former is a calque of the latter. Both mean "greed". Greed is the fact of seeking to have, right? Well, that's exactly what those words, apt in the typical Germanic manner, mean. The first elements (heb- and Hab-) are related to the verb "have"; and the second are related to the verb "seek".
The word "Sucht" is not related to "suchen" (to seek), but to "siechen" (to be sick). "Siechen" fell out of use in German, but the derived noun "Sucht" (="addiction") still exists.
 

Pacifica

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The word "Sucht" is not related to "suchen" (to seek), but to "siechen" (to be sick). "Siechen" fell out of use in German, but the derived noun "Sucht" (="addiction") still exists.
Ah, the "suchte" link here led to the wrong "suchte".
 
B

Bitmap

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There's some folk etymology around it ("Eifersucht ist eine Leidenschaft, die mit Eifer sucht, was Leiden schafft")*, but it really seems to come from an old word for sickness and is likely related to the English word "sick".

"Jealousy is a passion that zealously seeks what causes pain."

The noun "Sucht" and the verb "sucht" are pronounced differently, though.
 
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Matthaeus

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Or Sehnsucht... :D

 
 

Tironis

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There's some folk etymology around it ("Eifersucht ist eine Leidenschaft, die mit Eifer sucht, was Leiden schafft")*, but it really seems to come from an old word for sickness and is likely related to the English word "sick".

"Jealousy is a passion that zealously seeks what causes pain."

The noun "Sucht" and the verb "sucht" are pronounced differently, though.
Habsucht / Habgier. The verb "gieren": Cognate with Dutch gieren (“to scream”). Related also with German Geier (“vulture”) and gähnen, English yawn. In standard German, the word has always been associated with unrelated Gier (“greed, lust”) and is typically regarded a derivative thereof. Also compare English jeer, which could be a borrowing. (Wiki)
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris

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būsequa (= armentārius)
 

Pacifica

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Glabrigausapes

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Pacifica

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It provides some relief from selves being put on shelves by wicked elves or the like.
 
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