How would "valor" be translated into Latin?

Magnus4321

New Member

Location:
Canada
By "valor" ("valour") I mean courage, bravery, heroism, and tales of victory. It's not related to the Late Latin word valor (value or worth).

From what I've learned, virtus seems to be the right Classical Latin equivalent. However, virtus can mean many different things according to the context. To avoid ambiguity, I have been considering virtūs hērōum(?), factī hērōicī(?), opus hērōicum, fortitūdō, and virtūs mārtiālis(?).

What do you think is the best Latin translation for the word "valor", and why? My thank to you in advance!!
 

AoM

nulli numeri

  • Civis Illustris

Yup, virtus is definitely the right starting point. What’s the exact context/phrasing/sentence you need it for?
 

Magnus4321

New Member

Location:
Canada
What’s the exact context/phrasing/sentence you need it for?
In short mottos like "Live with valor" (Vīve cum virtute[?]) or "Bring back tales of valor" (Dīcitō nobis de tuis opus hērōicum[?]), where the context is not richly provided.

In English, we add qualifiers to words that potentially cause ambiguity. For example, "a good club can make all the difference in the world" can mean a couple of different things. To avoid ambiguity, the writer may instead say "a good recreation club can make all the difference in the world," or "a good club can make all the difference in the world of clubbing seals."

I wonder what is the correct way to express virtūs in the classic sense of being valorous (so to clarify that I do not mean virtues in the general sense). Maybe virtūs mārtiālis? virtūs hērōica?
 

Michael Zwingli

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

By "valor" ("valour") I mean courage, bravery, heroism…
There is always animositas, but with that you run into the same essential problem regarding the breadth of its semantic field. Semantically speaking, virtus = “courage” < “manliness” and animositas = “courageousness” < “spiritedness”. To get technical about this, and to “split hairs”, virtus and animus mean “courage” referring to that quality itself, while animositas , being an attributive abstraction, refers to the quality of possessing courage (to a great degree). Audacia is more similar to animositas in this respect, and has a bit narrower of a field…but the semantics are a bit different (audacia = “courageousness” < “boldness”/“impetuousness”/“daring”).
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
fortitūdō
For the word "valor" alone, fortitudo is a good option if you're afraid of the ambiguity of virtus in the absence of context.

"Deeds of valor" can translate as fortia facta.
"Live with valor" (Vīve cum virtute[?])
Yes, or vive cum fortitudine, or vive fortiter.
"Bring back tales of valor" (Dīcitō nobis de tuis opus hērōicum[?])
That's not correct. But what do you mean exactly by bringing back the tales? Telling them again, or more like acting them again? Or causing new tales of valor to be told about you? (Answer if you actually want that sentence translated. I'm not sure you do. Perhaps you only want the word "valor" on its own.)
 

Magnus4321

New Member

Location:
Canada
That's not correct. But what do you mean exactly by bringing back the tales? Telling them again, or more like acting them again? Or causing new tales of valor to be told about you? (Answer if you actually want that sentence translated. I'm not sure you do. Perhaps you only want the word "valor" on its own.)
Thanks in advance. These are the sentences:
  1. Go forth my honorable champion.
  2. May your battles be glorious.
  3. And bring us tales of victory.
 

Petrus Cotoneus

Member

Location:
Cantabrigia Massachusettensium
Thanks in advance. These are the sentences:
  1. Go forth my honorable champion.
  2. May your battles be glorious.
  3. And bring us tales of victory.
  1. Prodi, mi propugnator* honeste.
  2. Gloriosa sint proelia tua.
  3. Et fabulas de victoria ad nos refer.

    *or victor, depending on the sense of "champion" that you intend
 

Gregorius Textor

Animal rationale

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Location:
Ohio, U.S.A.
Thanks in advance. These are the sentences:
  1. Go forth my honorable champion.
  2. May your battles be glorious.
  3. And bring us tales of victory.
We started with the word 'valor'. Was there not also a sentence containing 'valor' that you would like translated?
 

Magnus4321

New Member

Location:
Canada
Pacifica and others' translation of "valor" is already great. That was to answer Pacifica's question "Answer if you actually want that sentence translated". My sincere thanks!! I could not have used more precise words like you guys.
 
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