Horatius, Odes I, 37

Katarina

Civis

  • Civis

Location:
Slovenia
(...), dum Capitolio
regina dementis ruinas
funus et imperio parabat
contaminato cum grege turpium
morbo virorum, quidlibet inpotens
sperare fortunaque dulci
ebria.


"While the mad queen was preparing ruin and destruction to the Capitol and to the Roman state."
This is how I would translate the first part. But there are some problems ... It is strange to me that there is no conjunction between ruinas and funus but then follows et imperio. Also I think that time te word imperium yet didn't mean the state, the state was res publica. Am I right? So what exactly is here meant?

"... she was preparing it with a gang of dishonourable men." To what pertain contaminato and morbo? Both to grege? So with a gang of dishonourable men, which is corrupted with vice?
And then "(queen) unable to hope anything and drunk with sweet fortune"?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
"While the mad queen was preparing ruin and destruction to the Capitol and to the Roman state."
This is how I would translate the first part. But there are some problems ... It is strange to me that there is no conjunction between ruinas and funus but then follows et imperio.
In poetry, conjunctions sometimes come after one or more words of the part that they would usually start in prose. So here:

Capitolio
regina dementis ruinas
funus et imperio parabat


=

Capitolio regina dementis ruinas et funus imperio parabat

Dementis ruinas
is for Capitolio and funus is for imperio.
Also I think that time te word imperium yet didn't mean the state, the state was res publica. Am I right? So what exactly is here meant?
I guess you could translate it as "the empire" but it isn't very different in this context.
"... she was preparing it with a gang of dishonourable men." To what pertain contaminato and morbo? Both to grege? So with a gang of dishonourable men, which is corrupted with vice?
Contaminato goes with grege.

Given the word order I'd be inclined to read morbo as modifying turpium but I guess it could also go with contaminato.
unable to hope anything
Given the context it must be something more like "so mad as to hope for anything"—i.e. she was so (insolently) out of her mind that she hoped for (thought that she could achieve) the grandest things for herself.
 
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Katarina

Civis

  • Civis

Location:
Slovenia
deliberata morte ferocior:
saevis Liburnis scilicet invidens
privata deduci superbo
non humilis mulier triumpho.


How do you understand privata here?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
I wouldn't call it an apposition, but it does refer to the same subject as invidens does. Privata = "as a private woman", i.e. a woman without any official position—in this particular case, she would have been robbed of her status as a queen and reduced to that of a mere subject.
 
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