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For Pacifica - random quotes on Arabic and Qur'an

Pacifica

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However its meaning is a bit blurred and it can also mean reckoning (in the same sense as the day of reckoning in Christianity), which probably explains why you would say حسبي على الله, i.e. my reckoning is ’on’ God (i.e. is God’s affair).
So the answer to my question was actually "no"?

I mean, you said that حسب in ونعم الحسب حسبي meant "fate" or the like rather than "reckoning" as I had translated it. Then I asked you if that was also the case (i.e. "fate" rather than "reckoning") in وعليك حسبي and you said yes. But now you seem to be saying the contrary.
 

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Ah, I think I understand now. You said "yes" because it's also حَسْب there (rather than حَسَب), however it does mean "reckoning". Sorry, I was a bit confused.
 

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It'll be awkward to translate them as different words, though...
 

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Sorry I’m a bit lost in the exchange as well. It originally meant ’reckoning’ in the purely commercial sense, but in such phrases it really just means fate in the sense that God determines your fate depending on your merit (i.e. through some sort of reckoning), basically: "what will become of me is on you, Allah".
 

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Ratio will do, then... I guess.
 

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يا الله يا علي يا عظيم يا حليم يا عليم، أنت ربي وعليك حسبي، فنعم الرب ربي، ونعم الحسب حسبي، تنصر من تشاء، وأنت العزيز الرحيم

"O Deus, O Alte, O Magne, O Clemens, O sciens, tu dominus meus es, te penes ratio mea est—quam bonus dominus dominus meus! Quam bona ratio ratio mea! Quemcumque vis servas; tu potens et misericors es.



Iuste iudex ultionis,
Donum fac remissionis
Ante diem rationis

...

(Just a random quote from the Dies Irae that the حسب thing brought to mind.)
 

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نسألك العصمة في الحركات والسكنات والكلمات والإرادات والخطرات من الشكوك والظنون والأوهام الساترة للقلوب عن مطالعة الغيوب فقد ابتلي المؤمنون وزلزلوا زلزالا شديدا، ليقول المنافقون والذين في قلوبهم مرض ما وعدنا الله ورسوله إلا غرورا، فثبتنا وانصرنا وسخر لنا هذا البحر، كما سخرت البحر لموسى عليه السلام، وسخرت النار لإبراهيم عليه السلام، وسخرت الجبال والحديد لداوود عليه السلام، وسخرت الريح والشياطين والجن لسليمان عليه السلام، وسخر لنا كل بحر هو لك في الأرض والسماء، والملك والملكوت، وبحر الدنيا وبحر الآخرة، وسخر لنا شيئا يا من بيده ملكوت كل شيء

Quaesumus ut nos et in negotiis et in otiis et in verbis et in consiliis et in periculis protegas a suspicionibus et dubitationibus et coniecturis quibus corda velantur ne quae nondum percepta sunt investigent; nam temptati sunt credentes et vehementer iactati, ut simulatores et ii quibus in corde morbus est dicerent, 'Quod nobis Deus et Apostolus eius promiserunt, nihil aliud fuit quam fraus.' Confirma nos igitur et adiuva et subice nobis hoc mare sicut subiecisti Moysi (pax ei) mare, Abrahae (pax ei) ignem, David (pax ei) montes et ferrum, Salomoni (pax ei) ventum et daemones et genios; et subice nobis omne mare quod in terra et in caelo, in regno et in dominio habes, et mare huius saeculi et mare ultimi; subice nobis aliquid, tu cuius in manu est regnum omnium rerum.
 

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وسخر لنا شيئا
Mmm never saw that before in an affirmative sentence, isn’t it strange when translated word-for-word?
 

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Mmm never saw that before in an affirmative sentence, isn’t it strange when translated word-for-word?
In Latin it means "subject something (at least some/one thing) to us." Did I misunderstand the original? I wasn't entirely sure.
 

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In Latin it means "subject something (at least some/one thing) to us." Did I misunderstand the original? I wasn't entirely sure.
Maybe I’m the one missing something. "Please subject something to us" doesn’t make sense to me. What do you make of this? what thing?
 

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Maybe I’m the one missing something. "Please subject something to us" doesn’t make sense to me. What do you make of this? what thing?
And I agree about the literal translation, that’s what I understand too, but then it makes me think I haven’t really understood it.
 

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The PDF and the French book both have كل شيء instead of شيئا. The YouTube reading has شيئا.
 

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The PDF and the French book both have كل شيء instead of شيئا.
As does the Scandinavian book. It seems to be the majority reading, so probably right?

نسألك العصمة في الحركات والسكنات والكلمات والإرادات والخطرات من الشكوك والظنون والأوهام الساترة للقلوب عن مطالعة الغيوب فقد ابتلي المؤمنون وزلزلوا زلزالا شديدا، ليقول المنافقون والذين في قلوبهم مرض ما وعدنا الله ورسوله إلا غرورا، فثبتنا وانصرنا وسخر لنا هذا البحر، كما سخرت البحر لموسى عليه السلام، وسخرت النار لإبراهيم عليه السلام، وسخرت الجبال والحديد لداوود عليه السلام، وسخرت الريح والشياطين والجن لسليمان عليه السلام، وسخر لنا كل بحر هو لك في الأرض والسماء، والملك والملكوت، وبحر الدنيا وبحر الآخرة، وسخر لنا كل شيء يا من بيده ملكوت كل شيء

Quaesumus ut nos et in negotiis et in otiis et in verbis et in consiliis et in periculis protegas a suspicionibus et dubitationibus et coniecturis quibus corda velantur ne quae nondum percepta sunt investigent; nam temptati sunt credentes et vehementer iactati, ut simulatores et ii quibus in corde morbus est dicerent, 'Quod nobis Deus et Apostolus eius promiserunt, nihil aliud fuit quam fraus.' Confirma nos igitur et adiuva et subice nobis hoc mare sicut subiecisti Moysi (pax ei) mare, Abrahae (pax ei) ignem, David (pax ei) montes et ferrum, Salomoni (pax ei) ventum et daemones et genios; et subice nobis omne mare quod in terra et in caelo, in regno et in dominio habes, et mare huius saeculi et mare ultimi; subice nobis omnia, tu cuius in manu est regnum omnium rerum.



I have a question.

As I've said before, I thought من was an indefinite kind of "who", like "whoever", while a "who" that was clearly identified would be الذي. I seem to have noticed, though, that that isn't always the case. In the above passage for instance, by my rule I would have expected يا الذي بيده ملكوت كل شيء, yet we have من instead of الذي even though the "who" is clearly identified as God (it's by no means a "whoever"). So is there a rule about this?
 

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As does the Scandinavian book. It seems to be the majority reading, so probably right?
To me that's the only one that makes sense. I may be missing something but I just don't get the other option.

As I've said before, I thought من was an indefinite kind of "who", like "whoever", while a "who" that was clearly identified would be الذي. I seem to have noticed, though, that that isn't always the case. In the above passage for instance, by my rule I would have expected يا الذي بيده ملكوت كل شيء, yet we have من instead of الذي even though the "who" is clearly identified as God (it's by no means a "whoever"). So is there a rule about this?
I don't remember reading a specific rule about it but usage clearly favors man = whoever, and this here sounds slightly unusual to me.
 

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كهيعص حم عسق، انصرنا فإنك خير الناصرين، وافتح لنا فإنك خير الفاتحين، واغفر لنا فإنك خير الغافرين، وارحمنا فإنك خير الراحمين، وارزقني فإنك خير الرازقين، واهدنا ونجنا من القوم الظالمين، وهب لنا ريحا طيبة كما هي في علمك، انشرها علينا من خزائن رحمتك، واحملنا بها حمل الكرامة مع السلامة والعافية في الدين والدنيا والآخرة، إنك على كل شيء قدير
"Grant us a good wind such as is in your knowledge"...? Not sure I've got that right. And if it is right, I'm not sure what it means.
 

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كهيعص حم عسق، انصرنا فإنك خير الناصرين، وافتح لنا فإنك خير الفاتحين، واغفر لنا فإنك خير الغافرين، وارحمنا فإنك خير الراحمين، وارزقني فإنك خير الرازقين، واهدنا ونجنا من القوم الظالمين، وهب لنا ريحا طيبة كما هي في علمك، انشرها علينا من خزائن رحمتك، واحملنا بها حمل الكرامة مع السلامة والعافية في الدين والدنيا والآخرة، إنك على كل شيء قدير
"Grant us a good wind such as is in your knowledge"...? Not sure I've got that right. And if it is right, I'm not sure what it means.
I don’t know, sorry... رائحة طيبة and ريح طيبة sent by Allah in the Qur’an come up in several places but I don’t see how this relates to his knowledge. This may be a reference to some hadith (or Qur’anic passage I don’t know), but I just googled the three words together and nothing came up. Sorry!
 

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Ah, well. I take it I at least got the literal translation right?
 

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كهيعص حم عسق، انصرنا فإنك خير الناصرين، وافتح لنا فإنك خير الفاتحين، واغفر لنا فإنك خير الغافرين، وارحمنا فإنك خير الراحمين، وارزقنا فإنك خير الرازقين، واهدنا ونجنا من القوم الظالمين، وهب لنا ريحا طيبة كما هي في علمك، انشرها علينا من خزائن رحمتك، واحملنا بها حمل الكرامة مع السلامة والعافية في الدين والدنيا والآخرة، إنك على كل شيء قدير​

"And bear us by means of it (i.e. the good wind) with the bearing of miracles." That's another thing I'm not sure how to interpret. "To bear with the bearing of X" would usually mean "to bear like X, to bear in the same way as X bears" but I don't know if that works here. Maybe the idea is like "bear us miraculously"? Or "bear us while at the same time granting us miracles"?
 
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