For Pacifica - random quotes on Arabic and Qur'an

Clemens

Aedilis

  • Aedilis

Location:
Maine, United States.
I guess I'm having trouble making sense of how Arabic can have both constructs & a genitive. So it must have both a construct genitive (meaning roughly 'of-something-of') & an absolutive genitive? What would that even look like?
In the Arabic construct state, it's "something of something," with the second "something" being in the "genitive" case, the first "something" in whatever case is needed by the syntax, but using definite endings (without the definite article). Some nouns also behave slightly differently when they are the first element in a construct phrase.
 

Glabrigausapes

Philistine

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Milwaukee
Can I ask, does the word "rope" really appear in 2:15?
"Allah will throw back their mockery on them, and give them rope in their trespasses; so they will wander like blind ones (To and fro)."
15. اللَّهُ يَسْتَهْزِئُ بِهِمْ وَيَمُدُّهُمْ فِي طُغْيَانِهِمْ يَعْمَهُونَ
 

Glabrigausapes

Philistine

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Milwaukee
Also, what the shit is it supposed to mean?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
My gosh, this is when the Arabic writing system shows its limits if you don't use diacritics. And, it was stupid of me not to clarify, but I wasn't thinking.

Me dixit:
هل سبق وعشت في عمان أو زرتها؟
Omar dixit:
Amman or Oman?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
فلما رأى الملك شهريار ذلك الأمر طار عقله من رأسه

"When king Shahriar saw this (viz. his wife cheating on him), his reason flew out of his head."

I rather like that expression.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
When I came across this word just now I thought it might be the origin of English "booze" but it's not.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
Omar just shared this with me.

366741471_139911232497122_5179808706645289771_n.jpg




None of it surprises me except the fact that Greek apparently has so much fewer Arabic loans.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
Well, I guess I would also have thought French had more of them than English... but the difference isn't all that striking.
 

kizolk

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Bourgogne, France
I find the difference between Portuguese and Spanish very surprising actually. I would've expected the numbers to be more or less the same. And I would've expected the Portuguese number to be much higher than the French one, for instance. Although I guess we should make a distinction between everyday words, and words in the dictionary. In terms of everyday speech, I'd be very surprised if Portuguese didn't have much more Arabic words than French. Of course, I could be wrong.

Coincidentally, I was talking about that earlier this week: it's kinda weird that a word for something as common lettuce is of Arabic origins, alface.
 

kizolk

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Bourgogne, France
it's kinda weird that a word for something as common lettuce is of Arabic origins,
Not only common, but problably something that has been known in Europe for ages. Maybe the Arabic word simply supplanted the native one.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
I guess we should make a distinction between everyday words, and words in the dictionary
This map is certainly based on the latter. There's no way I can think of hundreds of Arabic-derived words in English or French; most of them must be obscure terms I've never encountered.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
(Of course, there are probably also words I know and never realized are of Arabic origin, but I doubt they make up such numbers.)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
From the description of a very beautiful woman:

وبطن مطوي تحت الثياب كطي السجل للكتاب

"and (she had) a belly folded under her dress like the fold of a bookscroll"

... what?

Not sure how to visualize that.

Firm and smooth, maybe?
 

Clemens

Aedilis

  • Aedilis

Location:
Maine, United States.
Not only common, but problably something that has been known in Europe for ages. Maybe the Arabic word simply supplanted the native one.
That's not the only example of this, such as azafrán or azul in Spanish. I'm also amused by Greek or Latin words (from antiquity) borrowed into Arabic and then into modern European languages.
 

kizolk

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Bourgogne, France
Firm and smooth, maybe?
Maybe. But I still would find it weird!
That's not the only example of this, such as azafrán or azul in Spanish.
Sure, and when I wrote that I thought of the Portuguese word for eggplant for instance, beringela, which is Arabic as well, just like the French equivalent, aubergine. But like saffron, there's at least the possibility that it was discovered by Europeans on the late, hence making a borrowing unsurprising, but lettuce at least seems less exotic. Azul is surprising as well, but on the other hand, names for colors or specific color hues are often borrowed.
 
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Clemens

Aedilis

  • Aedilis

Location:
Maine, United States.
But like saffron, there's at least the possibility that it was discovered by Europeans on the late, hence making a borrowing unsurprising, but lettuce at least seems less exotic.
I was under the impression that saffron, like rice, was known to the ancient Romans but under a different name.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
on the late
Is that a legit expression in English? (I know it is in French.)
I was under the impression that saffron, like rice, was known to the ancient Romans but under a different name.
Saffron was crocum or crocus (the former usually for the spice and the latter for the plant, I think), and rice was oryza, which sounds like it might have the same origin as "rice" (?)
 
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