Eadem mutata resurgo

Aenesidemus

Member

What is the first appearance in literature of the phrase Eadem mutata resurgo ? Sites tend to imply that it was made up by Jakob Bernoulli, but there's no way that a man of his era (c. 1700) would have referred to himself in the feminine gender: therefore, it is a quote from an earlier work, Which one?
 

AoM

nulli numeri

  • Civis Illustris

Based on Wikipedia's description ("Bernoulli wanted a logarithmic spiral and the motto Eadem mutata resurgo ('Although changed, I rise again the same') engraved on his tombstone."), it could be referring to the spiral, right? Not sure if it's what he would've used, but imagine a word like spira as the subject.
 

Iacobinus

Civis

  • Civis

Location:
Lutetiæ Parisiorum
but there's no way that a man of his era (c. 1700) would have referred to himself in the feminine gender: therefore, it is a quote from an earlier work, Which one?
That is a wrong prejudice, I'd say...

Men of that time were actually less confused by the clear distinction between grammatical gender and sex... than are our contemporaries.
French monarchs of this era commonly referred to themselves in the feminine gender, for example, not because they did feel they would be women or ladies, but because the subject of their sentence, majesté is feminine, so every pronoun, adjective and participle of the sentence had to agree with it.

Men of that time were also referred in the feminine gender by their interlocutors. The Canadian Pierre du Calvet wrote to George III: « Les nôtres ont depuis longtemps prononcé en faveur de Votre Majesté : Elle met sa gloire à être le père de ses sujets : Elle n’estime dans la royauté que le pouvoir qu’elle Lui donne de faire des heureux. La clémence, l’humanité, l’amour de la justice et des lois, toutes les vertus règnent avec Elle sur le trône. La reconnaissance publique se charge de transmettre à la postérité, le nom de Votre Majesté, avec tous les transports de l’admiration et de l’amour. »
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
qu’elle
This elle refers to "la royauté". (In addition to the meaning of the sentence, also note the lower case e, as opposed to the capital L of the following Lui, which refers to the Majesté.)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
By the way, the third person singular feminine pronoun is still the standard way to address a superior or stranger politely in Italian, whatever their gender. It's basically become a formal "you", but a similar feminine noun ("your majesty/excellence" or the like) was originally implied.
 
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kizolk

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Bourgogne, France
By the way, the third person singular feminine pronoun is still the standard way to address a superior or stranger politely in Italian, whatever their gender. It's basically become a formal "you", but a similar feminine noun ("your majesty/excellence" or the like) was originally implied.
I never thought about that.
 

Aenesidemus

Member

Based on Wikipedia's description ("Bernoulli wanted a logarithmic spiral and the motto Eadem mutata resurgo ('Although changed, I rise again the same') engraved on his tombstone."), it could be referring to the spiral, right? Not sure if it's what he would've used, but imagine a word like spira as the subject.
Thank you!
 

Aenesidemus

Member

Based on Wikipedia's description ("Bernoulli wanted a logarithmic spiral and the motto Eadem mutata resurgo ('Although changed, I rise again the same') engraved on his tombstone."), it could be referring to the spiral, right? Not sure if it's what he would've used, but imagine a word like spira as the subject.
I think you're right, and here's a bit of support:

“Spira mirabilis” is how Jakob Bernoulli used to call the logarithmic spiral. It means “miraculous spiral”
-- https://medium.com/woodworkers-of-the-world-unite/geometry-universe-self-poetry-775352c2c04f
 
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