dilato

massimo.p

Civis

  • Civis

Can the verb dilato, -are take both an accusative and dative object? In the Vulgate you find the following phrase, "in tribulatione dilasti mihi:" and in (my) tribulation you have enlarged me.

I can't seem to find this as one of the verbs that take both the accusative and dative object.
 

Notascooby

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

It's maybe best not to apply hard and fast rules to the grammar contained in the Latin Vulgate. It is a translation which sticks very close to it's source material.

Here you could infer a direct object understood i.e 'You have enlarged (something) for me( to my advantage).

I would be inclined to want to read it as simply 'You have enlarged( yourself) for me' That is to say 'Given room to me'.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
Here you could infer a direct object understood i.e 'You have enlarged (something) for me( to my advantage).
That's what I assumed. And that would be a Hebrew idiom translated literally, as is often the case when you find odd things in the Vulgate. I looked up the Hebrew and it does say literally something like "you have enlarged/widened (something) for me.

It think the idea may be "you have made things easy (or easier) for me": when things were "narrow" (i.e. oppressive, difficult) you have "widened" them (i.e. made them easier).
 

Notascooby

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

That's what I assumed. And that would be a Hebrew idiom translated literally, as is often the case when you find odd things in the Vulgate. I looked up the Hebrew and it does say literally something like "you have enlarged/widened (something) for me.

It think the idea may be "you have made things easy (or easier) for me": when things were "narrow" (i.e. oppressive, difficult) you have "widened" them (i.e. made them easier).
The Psalms in the Vulgate are translated from a Greek text. Sometimes it being a literal translation of a literal translation makes things interesting. Here it's not too bad.
 
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