caelum

Pelayo

Member

Per the Wiktionary entry for caelum, it is neuter in the singular and masculine in the plural.

I'm working through some LLPSI exercises (see here) and they give an example of:

NumerusPlūrālis
Questionquis?
Pronounhic
Nouncaelum
Adjectivetuus

So, I treat this as hi caeli tui, but the correct answer per their form is haec caeli tua, treating it as neuter throughout, though masculine in form.

Is this a mistake in the LLPSI declension game, am I reading the Wiktionary entry wrong, or what?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
It's a mistake in the game. The plural caeli doesn't just look masculine, it is masculine, so any adjective etc. modifying it must agree accordingly.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
I don't understand the "question" part.
 

Pelayo

Member

I don't understand the "question" part.
I think it is practice for interrogatives. It has quis, cui, cuius, etc. So putting the “answer” in the correct case.
 

scrabulista

Consul

  • Consul

Location:
Tennessee
There's another caelum, neuter, meaning "chisel."

haec caeli tua = "these (bits of?) chisel are yours" or "these (bits of) sky are yours" ??
haec and tua could also be feminine nominative singular.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
I think it is practice for interrogatives. It has quis, cui, cuius, etc. So putting the “answer” in the correct case.
Does quis stand for a question to which "these skies of yours" is the answer? "These skies of yours" seems an unlikely answer to the question "who?" which is what quis means.
haec caeli tua = "these (bits of?) chisel are yours" or "these (bits of) sky are yours" ??
In theory it could mean those things, though such a wording seems unlikely.
 
Last edited:

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Aedilis

Location:
Belgium
Does quis stand for a question to which "these skies of yours" is the answer?
I just had a look at the site and that seems to be it. Apparently the interrogative word tells you what case the answer should be in; the case isn't specified anywhere else. So here the answer had to be nominative, like quis. Quid (meaning "what") would have been a more likely question word, but then quid can be accusative as well as nominative so you wouldn't have known which of the two cases was required. All and all it might have been better to simply name the case. Or I guess they could have used quae res and quam rem instead of quid. But it would have been unnecessary complication, perhaps.
 
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